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SOUP's on: meal-based micro-grant program for creative projects takes root in cleveland

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
Based on the dinner-party model, Cleveland SOUP provides financial support for innovative, locally based initiatives that touch on sustainability, public art and diversity. As garnering funds can often be one of the tallest hurdles for independent upstarts, SOUP has helped offset those costs in more than 60 cities.

travel writer discovers 'the quirky side of cleveland'

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
In feature titled “Discovering the quirky side of Cleveland,” travel writer Katherine Calos of the Richmond Times-Dispatch focuses on the less conventional side of some Cleveland hotspots.   “You really know a city when you know its quirks. So, let’s get to know Cleveland,” she leads off. “Where else would you find the world’s largest chandelier hanging over a city street, Froot Loops on hot dogs, religious statues lovingly restored by a makeup artist, a leg lamp in the Christmas house that made it famous, a portrait featuring eye protection from whale-oil lamps and a museum that’s enshrined the remains of a disc jockey?” Highlighted for inclusion are: The Happy Dog: “Chili cheese dogs seem a little lame when compared with the Mobile Home-Wrecker, the Sunday Night Special, the 1:45 AM Special and East Meets West -- a few of the suggestions for combining the 50 available toppings for the $5 hot dogs.” The Playhouse Square Chandelier: “The world’s largest outdoor chandelier, according to the Guinness World Records, became the centerpiece of Cleveland’s theater district in May. It’s already become an icon for Playhouse Square.” A Christmas Story House: “If you’ve ever marveled at the supreme tackiness of the leg lamp in the 1983 movie “A Christmas Story,” you’ll love it in its natural setting.” Cleveland Museum of Art: “Put on your coolest shades for a ‘selfie’ with Nathaniel Olds. That’s what he did when he sat for a portrait in 1837. His fashionable green-tinted eyeglasses offered protection from the bright light of Argand lamps, which produced about 10 times as much light as other whale-oil lamps.”   Read the rest right here.

charlotte writer visits home -- superman’s home that is

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
In a travel feature titled “At home -- really -- with Superman,” Charlotte Observer writer John Bordsen spends some quality time in the Cleveland home where Superman was born. “Superman, the story goes, was born on the planet Krypton and sent to Earth in a small rocket by his father when that planet was about to explode. He was actually born in 1933 in a two-story bungalow in a scruffy neighborhood on the east side of Cleveland, probably in the attic.” The home, in Cleveland’s Glenville neighborhood, was the residence of the Siegel family, whose son Jerry created most famous superhero. Jerry wrote the story while his neighborhood friend Joe Shuster drew the cartoon. Superman’s inaugural appearance was in Action Comics’ first issue, published in 1938. “Drawing from Tarzan books and comic strips and Tarzan movie star Johnny Weissmuller, plus Dick Tracy, Buck Rogers and other pop idols, their Superman gradually evolved from a villainous mastermind to a good guy with super powers and a secret identity.”   Read more here.

recently profiled holmes applesauce exceeds fundraising goals, looks ahead

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
It’s been a busy month for Ethan Holmes, founder of Holmes Mouthwatering Applesauce. The 20-year-old took home $500 from Entrovation earlier this summer before moving into the Cleveland Culinary Launch and Kitchen (CCLK). He then launched an Indiegogo campaign in hopes of raising $1,500, but raised $2,274. He also received 100 pre-orders and produced 400 jars, or 5,000 ounces, of his original and cinnamon applesauce in two days during his first session at CCLK. “Producing in the kitchen was challenging,” Holmes says. “I had never made such large quantities in such a short period of time.” But with the help of friends and family, Holmes filled his orders, then hand-delivered jars of applesauce in gift bags to all of the local contributors to the campaign.   Holmes plans to sell heavily at local farmers markets this fall and is in talks with area restaurants about some menu collaborations. He also is waiting to hear from some retailers about carrying the applesauce.   Holmes headed back to college last weekend feeling optimistic about the future of Holmes Mouthwatering Applesauce. “It felt amazing to surpass my goal,” he says. “It was unbelievable to have so much support from family, friends and those interested in my product. I tried crowdfunding a year ago on Kickstarter and failed my goal, so having the strength to try again and actually being successful this time is such a great feeling to have.”

how the arts inspire change in detroit

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
In Detroit, art isn’t just something to look at. The city’s rich artistic tradition has been an essential ingredient for cultivating community resilience, engagement and vitality.

reps from prior convention host cities offer tips on how best to leverage the big show

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
Tampa Bay successfully hosted the Republicans in 2012, and Denver hosted the Democrats four years before that. Fresh Water decided to reach out to representatives from each city to see if our fair city could glean some best practices on how to pull off a successful -- and inclusive -- convention.

new owners transform winchester music hall into the bevy with live music and food

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
The Winchester Music Hall, a classic Lakewood venue that closed late last year after a decades-long run, will soon enjoy a new lease on life as The Bevy in Birdtown, a restaurant and music venue set to open next month. New owners Patty Lim and Beth Scebbi of New Century Builders have completely refreshed the space. The bar area has new flooring, a new ceiling, fresh paint and custom-designed lighting crafted from old wine bottles. There are eight draft beer lines, and a new kitchen will allow for a full-service menu that is scheduled to start sometime in October. "We felt that Madison Avenue is really going to be taking over," says Lim. "Detroit Avenue is at its peak, and this is the next phase of development in Lakewood." County records show that Dially's Investment Group LLC purchased the building for $150,000 in July from previous owner James Mileti. The building needed to be updated, and the new owners are not only renovating the space, but also adding some new touches that will likely make the Bevy a popular destination spot. Lim and Sceibbi have cleaned up the historic sandstone and brick exterior, and they're adding a prominent sign featuring The Bevy's logo (a martini glass with birds flying around it -- how cool is that?). They're also adding a large sidewalk patio to take advantage of the building's deep sidewalk. Next year, they plan to transform a lovely brick nook alongside the building into a second patio area. The Bevy will feature a full lineup of entertainment scheduled to start later this year. Lim plans to hire not only bands playing rock, blues, jazz and other styles, but also comedians. She's not worried about competition from The Music Box, Vosh, Mahall's 20 Lanes or other nearby venues, saying "the more the merrier." The music hall, which is located in a former bowling alley, will become a bit cozier thanks to the addition of a private party room and offices in the rear. The party room will be nicknamed The Winchester, and the owners plan to keep the historic logo that's painted on the wall. The new hall will feature a section with hardwood floors for dancing, upgraded seating, high-top tables and a standing area. Lim, who got her start as manager with Cleveland PM restaurant in Valleyview, is glad to be back in the restaurant and bar business. She sees great opportunity in Lakewood, and points to the businesses that are moving to Lakewood and the renovated Madison Avenue streetscape as signs of the area's revival.

navy pr pop-up vintage clothing shop to open in gordon square

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
Fashion industry veteran Mary Peffer road-tripped across the U.S. to source vintage clothing for her new pop-up shop in the Gordon Square Arts District. The Cleveland native, who is a consultant in Los Angeles, sifted through estate sales in Boise, Idaho; rooted around at thrift stores in Portland, Oregon; and hunted in stores in North Carolina and Texas, to name a few. Now, Peffer's unique shop is set to open next week. The NAVY PRoject, which is named after Peffer's communications consulting firm specializing in art, architecture, design, fashion and hospitality, will offer vintage, unisex, ready-to-wear clothing. Examples include vintage Levis, letterman jackets, vintage jackets, CPO jackets ("Chief Petty Officer") and deadstock army t-shirts. Peffer, who has worked for companies like Nanette Lepore and Saint Laurent, says that she was inspired by trends she saw on the runway. As a Cleveland native and lover of the city, she wanted to bring her ideas home. "There's a lot of excitement about these fashion trends, but I think it's nonsense when I hear that everyone can't have access to it," says Peffer, whose store will open Friday, September 5th and remain open through October. "I thought, why not go to the source and give it to people for a different price?" Peffer, who owns NAVY PR with her sister-in-law Melinda Peffer, says she's looking forward to being in Cleveland and spending time with family and friends. Her brother, Stephen Peffer, runs the Hausfrau record store in Gordon Square. Peffer says the NAVY PRoject will launch a series of pop-up shops in emerging markets across the U.S. No details have been announced about future locations. Regarding her fashion road show, Peffer quips, "I thought, 'Well, if everyone just laughs in my face, I'll just keep everything and have this killer wardrobe.'" The NAVY PRoject will be located at 6602 Detroit Avenue and will have regular hours from Wednesday through Sunday. Peffer says it will be a great place to hang out, with curated racks that are easy to browse and art from Brooklyn-based artist Savannah King of Third Eye and Cleveland illustrator Deanna First. The clothing will also be affordable, with everything priced under $100.     

spruce selects borrow rentals for free pr services promotion

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
Tom Sarago, owner of Spruce, chose Borrow Rentals as the winning company to receive free marketing and PR services. Sarago, who started his full-service marketing communications firm earlier this summer, offered the services to one company as a way to promote Spruce and help a worthy company. Spruce received about 20 applications for his services. Sarago chose a few finalists before naming Ann King, owner of Borrow Rentals as the winner. Borrow is an eclectic and vintage rental house for furniture and accessories to furnish any event. “I just found Ann intriguing,” says Sarago. “She’s clearly doing so much of a good thing, I can just step in and enhance.”   King, who read about the contest in Fresh Water, applied because she needed the services Spruce provides. “We are such a small boutique company – we don’t have a marketing department and we don’t know how to get in the press,” she says.   Professional photography firm Kalman and Pabst shot promotional photos of King as part of the package. Spruce will provide PR services. “"She needs some assistance in a couple of key areas and we're working to develop a plan on how to build new relationships," Sarago says of what he’ll provide. “She wants to find new audiences and engage her existing ones. We’re helping her with social media, starting a newsletter and we will issue regular press releases.”   Both Sarago and King see this as the start to an ongoing relationship. “He’s awesome,” says King. “He’s so great and I’m so excited to work together and try to promote our brands. Hopefully we can help each other out – mostly to promote Borrow.”   In addition to working with King, Sarago says he enjoyed meeting the other applicants. “It was wonderful to hear about all these companies doing some amazing things,” he says. “Companies I wouldn’t otherwise have met.”  

content marketing world 2014 to draw the top communications pros, kevin spacey

Thu, 08/28/2014 - 12:00am
More than 2,500 people from 50 countries are expected to descend on Cleveland September 8-11 for the Content Marketing World 2014 conference. Professionals in marketing, communications, social media and public relations are coming to learn what’s new in the industry, socialize and network.     “Those people attending are marketers in enterprises that create and distribute content to attract and retain customers,” explains event organizer Joe Pulizzi, founder the Content Marketing Institute. “Over half of the attendees come from the brand side, with the rest of the delegates coming from agencies, media companies and technology providers.”   Representatives from 36 of the Fortune 100 will attend, 10 in the Fortune 15. “The event targets the largest marketers from the leading brands around the world, so we not only attract Fortune 100 companies, but the majority of delegates come from at least the Fortune 5000 size,” says Pulizzi. “CMW is now the largest event in the content marketing industry.”   It makes sense the conference takes place in Cleveland, says Pulizzi. “The talent in the Northeast Ohio region for content creators is amazing,” he says, “Most people don't realize this, but for many decades, this area has been home to some of the best business publishing on the planet, In addition to that, ‘content marketing,’ as a term, might first have been used in Cleveland.”   While the main events, with speakers and workshops, take place at the Cleveland Convention Center, the opening reception on Monday, September 8 is an Ohio City pub crawl. CMW has rented out Market Garden BreweryBar Cento and Great Lakes Brewery. Tuesday night wraps up with ContentFest, a music festival with 10 local food trucks and bands at Jacobs Pavilion.   Pulizzi is excited to host the leaders in content marketing. “The over 175 speakers at the event come from around the world and are truly the leading experts in the field,” he says. “In addition, it's nice to show off Cleveland. In 2013, 75 percent of the attendees had never been to Cleveland.”   The keynote closing speaker is actor Kevin Spacey, currently starting in the Netflix hit, House of Cards. “Mr. Spacey is going to talk about how House of Cards has transformed the content business,” says Pulizzi. “He will share his thoughts on what enterprise marketers need to be doing to make sure their stories are told well, and how they can be found by engaged consumers.”   The economic impact for Cleveland is estimated to be $2.5 million, with a block of 4,000 room nights in downtown hotels already sold. Registration for the conference is still open.

residences at 1717 offer high-rise apartment living in the heart of cleveland

Tue, 08/26/2014 - 12:00am
Downtown Cleveland's residential population has reached 12,500 people, and apartment occupancy rates consistently hover in the 95-98 percent range. As a real estate broker once told me, "That's not really a vacancy rate, that's more like a turnover rate." Most buildings have waiting lists, and new properties continue to come online each year. Still, downtown doesn't have many high-rise apartment or condo buildings like you'd find in New York or Chicago, where you can perch above it all and look down at the vibrant, busy city swarming below. Spacious kitchen in a suite at the Residences at 1717Yet that's changing with the addition of The 9, which Fresh Water profiled last month, and the Residences at 1717, which we recently had a chance to tour. These units are under construction, with floors 2 through 5 now occupied and a new floor being unveiled every couple of weeks. Although the first residents have barely moved into the building, it's already 65 percent leased. The entire project, which features 223 units on 21 floors, is expected to be complete by March 2015. There are two commercial spaces on the first floor of the property, which, by the way, is the former East Ohio Gas building at East 9th and Superior. One of these spaces will be occupied by Al's Deli, which is relocating from the Galleria. The other space is not yet officially leased, but K&D, the developer behind the project, is purportedly in talks with various potential tenants. The Residences at 1717 features a handsome marble lobby built for the previous owner. The sales office is located in the Gas Light Theatre, a neat space with terrazzo floors where East Ohio Gas used to teach workers how to light pilots. The building was gutted from floor to ceiling, with the exception of key historic elements. The exterior wasn't altered, since the developers obtained historic tax credits. Large windows on all sides, the positioning of the building on a corner, and the small floor plate have made for an excellent residential conversion. Exterior of The Residences at 1717The real show is reserved for the spaces themselves. The elegant floor plans and high-quality amenities illustrate how far downtown living has evolved. The 1- and 2-bedroom suites feature granite countertops, ceramic tile floors, hardwood cabinets, walk-in closets, washer-dryer sets, stainless steel appliances, LED lighting and energy-efficient windows. One bedrooms start under $1,000, two bedrooms at about $1,700. The units are priced at about $1.25 per square foot, which is consistent with other downtown apartments but less than what the owners hope to get at The 9. The Residences at 1717 boast a surprising amount of square footage and expansive windows with premium views. Our tour guide was not able to take us above the fifth floor, yet we caught glimpses of northern views to the lake, western views towards the heart of Public Square, southern views towards Euclid Avenue and eastern views towards Cleveland State University. The two-bedrooms are positioned on the corners of the building with windows on both sides. The one-bedrooms also get plenty of natural light and offer views. Spacious kitchen in a two bedroom suite at the Residences at 1717The building's tinted windows offer privacy and shading while affording residents great views. Storm windows installed from the inside have created a quiet, cozy building. The entire place is certified LEED silver, which residents will appreciate because it makes the building not only greener, but more comfortable and affordable. K&D is offering a guaranteed rate increase of two percent per year for the first three years as long as you renew your lease within the expiration date. There's little space wasted in this thoughtfully designed building. Leasing agents say the units could be leased by the end of the year, and you get the sense it's not just hype. There's a shortage of move-in ready apartments downtown -- with many of the suites coming online, residents have to wait until they're finished.  

restored league park set to reopen following $6m renovation

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
League Park, the historic Hough ballfield where baseball legend Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run over the outfield wall in 1929, is set to reopen this weekend following a complete renovation. The reopening, in the works for years, will not only house the Baseball Heritage Museum, but also a replica of the original ticketing facility, a community room and a huge, new ballfield. It mimics the original down to the fact that home plate is set in the same spot as when Babe Ruth stood there. Councilman T. J. Dow hopes that the project will spark reinvestment in the Hough neighborhood. "We love the fact that we have a recreational park in the community, but it will also serve as an economic development piece," he says. "Many of the new homeowners moved here with the expectation that League Park would be rebuilt. We believe that it will serve as an anchor." Dow also believes that the park will serve as a tourist attraction, drawing baseball and history lovers from Greater Cleveland and beyond. The park has a special significance for the African-American community, since many black teams played here and the Buckeyes won the Negro World Series at League Park in 1920. The restored League Park will also serve as home field for many Cleveland Municipal School District teams, a special privilege since the park is quite large and has brand-new astroturf. Outside organizations can rent the field for a fee, and the money earned will go back into maintaining the park. The ticketing office and museum will be open for regular hours during the week and on weekends. "We have Hough residents who are starting up baseball clubs," says Dow, touting ways in which enhanced recreational opportunities will help the neighborhood. "They could play on the League Park field during the championship games." Although there is no active community development corporation in Hough and redevelopment plans stalled out in the recession, that could change. Dow is currently in the process of kicking off a neighborhood planning process, and envisions new housing built on tracts of vacant land around League Park. League Park is located at East 66th Street and Lexington Avenue. A grand opening party is set for Saturday, August 23rd at 1 p.m., and will feature the unveiling of the Fannie M. Lewis sculpture, an appearance by the Cleveland Blues vintage baseball team, a Home Run Derby and other activities.

chef mytro shares his personal and professional journey with daily meal

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
In an essay for the Daily Meal, a national food and drink publication, Matthew Mytro offers a personal look at his journey to becoming chef-partner at Flour Restaurant.   "If you’d asked me a few years ago, I would have told you that the moment I became a chef was when I put on my crispy white chef’s jacket with my name coupled with ‘executive chef’ at a now-defunct Cleveland restaurant. Looking back, not only was I in fact not a chef, but I really had no idea what I was doing. My chef’s jacket today is blank. The jacket -- or even the title -- does not define me. An inscribed jacket can make you too comfortable. And comfort is a chef’s worst enemy.”   Mytro recalls the precise moment in his life that he knew he wanted to become a chef.   “I was reading Kitchen Confidential on the bus heading home and happened to look up to see a bunch of chefs standing outside in their jackets, talking and smoking. It was this perfect trifecta of events and I was sold. I wanted this life -- or rather, the life I perceived those chefs to have.”   Ultimately, he landed at Flour in Moreland Hills, where he currently is chef and partner.   “I made my way to Flour where I met chef Paul Minnillo, a very well-respected, old school chef. We had instant chemistry. He taught me to take a step back and really focus on the details. He’s made me a better man and a much better chef.”   “I have no regrets about not going to culinary school and think my training and type of education can stack up to any. I learned long ago that school in the traditional sense does not make someone a chef. Discipline, passion, integrity, camaraderie and literally doing whatever it takes, no matter how long you’ve been sporting the coat… That is what makes a chef a chef.”   Read the rest of his recipe for success here.

travel industry news outlet digs into cleveland's tourism revival

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
In a TravelPulse feature titled “Cleveland's Tourism Renaissance Goes Way Beyond LeBron,” writer Ryan Rudnansky goes beyond the LeBron headlines to uncover causes behind the rise in the Cleveland travel and tourism bottom line.   “Cleveland has gotten a bad rap over the years, but the national perception of the Ohio city finally appears to be shifting, boosted by tourism numbers that speak for themselves,” he writes.   “Positively Cleveland -- the official tourism authority of Cleveland -- recently reported visitor expenditures of $7.4 billion for 2013, up 6.7 percent from 2011. That’s in addition to a 4 percent increase in both visitors (15.6 million to 16.2 million) and jobs (63,394) from 2012 to 2013.”   Key developments include a new convention center, hosting the National Senior Games and the Gay Games, and the upcoming Republican National Convention in 2016.   “It was not about politics,” Positively Cleveland President and CEO David Gilbert is quoted in the piece. “It was about, 'We’re going to embrace these 50,000 people that are going to come to our town because they are choosing to come to our town, and it’s our job to make sure that they feel welcomed.'”   “You can argue that Cleveland was in a 40-year recession and, quite frankly, under a lot of pressure. It was the butt of a lot of jokes, starting in the 1960s with Johnny Carson. I think what has come of it is this combination of sophistication and grit. You have this city with great arts and culture, a great culinary scene, pro sports, tremendous parks and Lake Erie in the backdrop of this old manufacturing town. Without the world-class ego. We’re sort of proud of the fact that it’s not all shiny and brand new. It’s a polished-up version of a beautiful old city. And it has a real depth of character and depth of soul to it.”   Read the rest right here

split-liver transplants performed at clinic benefit two recipients instead of one

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
More than 16,000 people in the United States are on the waiting list for a liver transplant, yet 10,000 die before they get one. Cleveland Clinic transplant surgeon Koji Hashimoto has spent the last nine years researching the practice of splitting a donor liver between two recipients, thus reducing demand. “There’s a big gap between supply and demand,” explains Hashimoto. “In many smaller recipients, the liver is too large. You can’t transplant a large liver into a small patient. So we can split the liver.”   Hashimoto performed split liver transplants in 25 patients in his study, which was published in the July American Journal of Transplantation. Some of Hashimoto’s patients received the left lobe of the liver, some received the right lobe. Two patients benefitted from one liver donated.   “The survival was the same as whole liver transplants,” says Hashimoto. “We’ve had an 80 percent survival rate after five years.”   Only a handful of hospitals are actively performing split liver transplants, with the Cleveland Clinic being one. “Many centers don’t do it because you have to have lots of people on the team and it’s very challenging,” Hashimoto explains. “With a split liver transplant you have two patients receiving livers at the same time. You have to divide the blood vessels too -- sometimes using microscopes in the transplant -- and one surgeon goes out to split the liver in the donor body.”   While the split liver allows surgeons to place an organ in smaller patients, such as children, larger patients benefit as well. “The liver is the only organ that can regenerate in the body,” says Hashimoto. “Eventually the liver will grow to the size to fit the patient.”

what cities like cleveland can learn from denver

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
Fueled by collaboration, the Mile High City is investing in transit-oriented development while also preserving its historic neighborhoods. Denver has gained 50,000 new residents in the past four years, outpacing its suburbs and most other metro areas.

new life for a grand old dame: terminal tower steps into the 21st century

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
Once among the tallest buildings in the world, the Terminal Tower remains the signature landmark of the Cleveland skyline. Following a massive top-to-bottom, inside-out renovation in 2005, the iconic structure is welcoming a host of new commercial tenants, including start-ups looking for co-working space. 

rust belt pepper co. offers an authentic taste from home: pepper relish

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
Christina Puterbaugh grew up developing a taste for something straight out of her Macedonian heritage: pepper relish. “It is my mom’s and dad's recipe that they brought from the old country when they came to the U.S. in 1960,” says Puterbaugh. “My sisters and I ate it growing up when my parents would roast the peppers in the driveway each fall and spend a week making the relish.” After the last of her three children was off to college, Puterbaugh, a stay-at-home mom, embarked on a career search. And then she thought of that pepper relish that she grew up with.   “I was ready to get involved in something I felt very passionate about and be responsible for something of my very own,” she recalls. “I love cooking and this recipe will always remind me of my parents, and I knew people would enjoy this so it all seemed to fit perfectly.”   With that, Rust Belt Pepper Company was born in Puterbaugh’s home-based kitchen. Customers loved the fire-roasted sweet red peppers in tomato sauce with garlic. Puterbaugh grew up eating the relish on homemade bread with feta cheese, but it has a wide variety of uses. “It’s a great appetizer on a French baguette with sprinkled feta cheese, a topping for grilled meat or fish, as a pizza sauce, in a bean dip, in pot of stew or on a Panini sandwich,” she suggests. “My husband's favorite is with scrambled eggs.”   As customers discovered Rust Belt Pepper, Puterbaugh, along with her mother Milica Lozanovich and daughter Michaela, struggled to keep up with demand. So this summer, after two years working from home, Rust Belt Pepper moved to the Cleveland Culinary Launch and Kitchen.   “The CCLK has been very helpful,” says Puterbaugh. “They provide me with their equipment and also help with labeling and getting my name and product out to the different businesses. Anyone starting a food business, the CCLK is the place to help you grow your business.”   Puterbaugh and Michaela now make the relish by the gallon, bottle it and label it each week at CCLK and still struggle to keep up with demand. Although it continues to be a family run business, Puterbaugh predicts that soon they will have to hire additional staff.   Rust Belt Pepper Company donates a portion of its proceeds to the American Brain Tumor Association in honor of Puterbaugh’s mother, a brain tumor survivor.   The relish is available throughout Northeast Ohio in stores like Zagara’s Marketplace and Miles Farmers Market, as well as farmers markets in the region.  

lakewood's lusso cosmetics are humane, fragrance-free and good looking

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
As a professional makeup artist, Lou McClung is well aware what goes into good (and bad) makeup. So he started making his own, ultimately opening up his own shop, Lusso Cosmetics, in Lakewood. “As a makeup artist, what I wanted to do was have my own products,” he says.   As one of the few independent cosmetics manufacturers in the country, McClung makes and sells his own lipstick, eye liner, lip gloss and powder. His products aren’t tested on animals and are fragrance-free. As much as possible, Lusso products are plant-based and made with beeswax.   McClung blends all of his own shades and he custom blends foundations and powders to match skin tones. He teaches his customers how to use his products with free consultations. “It’s really simple once I explain it,” he says. “No one ever took the time to show them. Most of my clients want to look natural and they’re surprised how little makeup they need – it’s about knowing where to put it. Having a quality product and finding what to do with the stuff is key.”   The satisfaction McClung gets comes in pleasing his clients. “I know when I’ve nailed it and have the right product or shade,” he says. “I love to see my clients enjoying it, and I know it enhances their lives.”   When McClung isn’t helping clients with their makeup needs, he’s restoring religious art. Four years ago he bought the entire closed St. Hedwig church parish and turned it into The Museum of Divine Statues -- a museum of religious artifacts. He’s purchased the artifacts from closed churches around Cleveland. He says the restoration process is pretty much the same as doing makeup, except he uses pigments and oil paints. THe museum is open Sundays from noon to 4pm and private tours can be arranged for groups of 30 or more. McClung is hosting a fundraiser on Sept. 27 to keep the museum going.   McClung employs an assistant and lives in the priest’s house on the parish property.  

how local is your beer? craft brewers increasingly employing local, seasonal ingredients

Thu, 08/21/2014 - 12:00am
Despite our obsession with locally brewed craft beer, many of the ingredients that go into those suds are anything but local. But that is quickly changing as area brewmasters increasingly seek out ways to tap into the local ‘farm-to-pint’ movement by adding more and more fresh ingredients.